Cosme McMoon is not Edwin McArthur: the final word

A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.

This email was forwarded to me by Donald Collup, who read my last entry and contacted a relative of Mr. McMunn, his grand-nephew Mark. Many thanks, Donald! And, Mr. Mcmunn, hopefully this post will act as the deciding word on the identity of your grand-uncle for those Florence Foster Jenkins detectives perusing the web. The difficulty in this Internet / Wikipedia culture is that falsehoods spread at the speed of a mouseclick. Though I guess this is nothing new, and these rumors over McMoon’s alterego have been circulating for some time, and in reputable sources. I wonder where and why they began…

Donald,
We are seeing how one single inaccuracy can become the truth to
some people, even though they are confronted with the facts. I have to do something about this because it is a disservice to my Uncle and Mr. McArthur for this inaccuracy to continue. I thought that your documentary would finally put an end to this inaccuracy, but alas some people will not let go of what they want to believe.

Many Thanks,
Mark

superhero

UPDATE! (1/5/09) I have been in conversations with Mark McMunn about his Grand Uncle Cosme. Mark is amazing and adamant about setting the record straight on his Grand Uncle. He just wrote this a few weeks ago: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_happened_to_cosme_mcmoon_after_florence_foster_jenkins_died.

And, also, he told me the following: “One of the main reasons FFJ chose him as her accompanist. Cosme had the ability to change the key of any piece instantly while playing, and because of this skill he could change keys when she changed, which as you know was often. What that means is that if she moved up say a fifth he could transpose the piece in his head instantly. Ask any pianist how difficult that is, and when people find this out I think they will realize that Cosme was in fact a rather skilled pianist. I can tell you though that his greatest skill was teaching. Cosme was one of those very rare teachers that could take the complicated, and make it easy to understand.”

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